Will Ukraine and Georgia join NATO?

NATO’s flirtation with adding 2 more members runs the risk of starting a war the US can’t afford to fight*

*https://www.businessinsider.com/nato-adding-ukraine-georgia-as-members-risks-war-with-russia-2021-10

General Lloyd Austin, “The U.S. must ensure NATO’s door remains open to Georgia and Ukraine…”

Hence is the U.S. & NATO’s conflict with Russia: just another bubble has burst, and people are asking: What’s going on? The answer is as if it were in a fairy tale: first, it was all Stalin’s fault, then Khrushchev-Brezhnev’s, and now it is Putin’s. They are behaving themselves as if they were the eternal virgins from Reeperbahn Street in Hamburg: “One leg here, one leg there, with the bottom asking for trouble…”

US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin is visiting Europe this week having said Ukraine and Georgia have an “open door to NATO” and that “no third country has a veto over NATO’s membership decisions.”

President Bush told Gorbachev and Shevardnadze, the Soviet foreign minister, ‘We don’t want you to do what you did in Hungary in 1956. We don’t want you to do what you did in Czechoslovakia in 1968. Don’t use your army, get it out of Germany,’” Raymond Berkley McGovern quoted Bush Sr.

In the end, the former CIA official said, the parties had agreed that the military would be withdrawn from East Germany and Germany would be reunified but on one key condition. “The U.S. had to promise not to move NATO further than East Germany. That was in 1991,” recalled the founder of the U.S. intelligence veteran organization. With the dissolution of the Warsaw Pact, the military organization of the Soviet bloc countries, the military forces were withdrawn not only from East Germany (the former GDR), but also from Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Poland. Moreover, in 1989, Gorbachev declared the end of the Cold War for the rest of the whole world to hear. How did the United States and NATO respond to that? A few years later, they declared themselves the winner in the Cold War, coined the Cold War Victory Medal, which they could have never won, even theoretically, given the military and economic potential of the USSR. Moreover, taking advantage of the collapse of the USSR, they began to behave not just as winners, at times as an occupation force with respect to the country they allegedly had defeated. Hence is the current conflict between the United States and NATO and Russia: just another soap bulb bursting, and people are asking: What’s going on? The answer is as if it were in a fairy tale: first, it was all Stalin’s fault, then Khrushchev-Brezhnev’s, and now it is Putin’s. They are behaving themselves as if they were the eternal virgins from Reeperbahn Street in Hamburg: “One leg here, one leg there, with the bottom asking for trouble…”

Before the peninsula became part of Russia, not only the U.S. but also NATO as a whole, had views on it. In June 2016, former CIA official Raymond Berkley McGovern, founder of the U.S. intelligence veteran organization, told Regnum news agency* that if Crimea had not joined Russia, NATO military bases would have appeared there. According to him, this story began not even in this decade or the past, but since the fall of the Berlin Wall.

By 2008, 12 countries had become new members of NATO, all of them “east of Germany.

This continued until 2008. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov summoned U.S. Ambassador to the Russian Federation William Joseph Burns and said: “Do you understand what ‘no’ means?” Ambassador Burns said, “Yes” and Lavrov said, “No means no. We have a red line. Don’t even think about accepting Ukraine and Georgia into NATO,” Lavrov said: “If you try to include Ukraine in NATO, there will most likely be a civil war, there will be all kinds of military clashes. We will have to; we Russians will have to decide whether we have to interfere or not. Militarily,” Sergei Lavrov was quoted as saying by the CIA veteran.

He emphasized that it was important for Russia to ensure that Sevastopol and Crimea did not become part of NATO. “Sometimes Mr. Putin shows a superb sense of humor. During those days he held one of the longest press conferences, and when asked, ‘Why did you decide to reincorporate Crimea?,’ he said, ‘Okay. I was thinking about Sevastopol. And I knew the NATO sailors were great guys. But I wouldn’t want them to give us permission to visit their base in Sevastopol. I’d rather we give them permission to visit our naval base in Sevastopol,” Raymond Berkley McGovern quoted Russian President Vladimir Putin as saying.

History Writer, WWII